What’s Going on Here?

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I was searching through our picture files for something specific the other day (can’t even remember what anymore) , and I happened on this picture of Steve, our Latin America Area Director.


When I showed it to another colleague here at Home Office, she joked matter-of-factly, “Oh, he’s killing him.” Mercifully, that’s not what’s going on at all! Let’s call this a ‘dry run’.

Taken at Nueva Belen (the Quechua church in Bolivia that was included in our recent Year End Projects), Steve and Pastor Diego are demonstrating to a number of candidates what to expect in the upcoming baptism service. This is an example of the creativity we celebrate here: with the language barrier between Quechua and Spanish, it is far easier for them to show this than to try to explain it.

But it sure makes for some rather unusual photo ops!

Op-Ed: Missions as Activism?

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If you’re into missions, there’s a good chance it’s because you care about people. But sometimes as we face a large, hurting world, it’s challenging to know where to begin. Some turn to politicians, trying to implement a large-scale change from the leadership. Others work socially, trying to change the mindset of their friends and peers. And some simply give up before they even get started. The problems are so overwhelming, the question becomes “Why bother?” or “What can I do?”

I think it’s interesting that the world is becoming increasingly activist. There is more media emphasis on the environment (e.g. An Inconvenient Truth), on social justice issues (e.g. The Constant Gardner and Blood Diamond), war in the Middle East, and a host of other causes. This is both good and bad for the church. Good, because people are getting used to being involved in some way. Bad, because it’s easy to treat being a Christian like just one more agenda. And that’s not the way it’s supposed to be.

I like this quote taken from the 1999 MSF Nobel Prize acceptance speech: “Humanitarianism is not a tool to end war or to create peace. It is a citizens’ response to political failure.” What does this imply for Christians? As Christians, we are compelled to act out the love we claim. And there are innumerable failures to be addressed with it. Sometimes action needs to be impulsive. Even dangerous.

Missions involves risk. We all recognise and honour the risk. But we each need to adopt some of it. It’s God’s greater vision. And He promises that, one way or another, the payoff is worth the price!

Agua Viva Building Progress

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The building project in Mexico for the Agua Viva (Living Water) church is developing swiftly.

As reported by Reg and Linda, a couple deeply connected with the Mexico team, this phase of the building project has been completed in a remarkable five weeks! The basis of the construction project is a steel structure, covered in styrofoam which is then coated with concrete. A team from Webster, Alberta offered their assistance with this stage.

Give thanks with us for the amazing accomplishments this past six weeks! Would you like to join is in Hermosillo to carry on this great kingdom project? We need electricians, plumbers, and drywallers. If you want to participate, send us an email.